1920s

The flapper era of the Great Gatsby – 1920's (1918 - 1933) - this was the first Europe had seen anything like this - It went beyond the brief relaxed and comfortable simplicity of the 1790s. The old conventions and clothes vanished after the end of the Great War in 1918. The old dresses were put away or remodelled – they were unwearable.

They are almost a hundred years old now. The silks of the beaded flapper dresses are mostly not strong enough for everyday use . These are treasures that need care to preserve for future generations.

The woolen dresses and coats are durable enough to wear but they are also museum pieces now and valuable references to all but lost technology and culture.

Still in the 1920s and even into the 50s the shirts are made from long-fibre hand-cleaned cotton producing smooth lint free fabric which shines and wears well and doesn't pill, unlike the chopped short-fibre machine processed cottons of today.

Here are a few photographs to start with

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Mens' and womens' 1920's vintage clothes and accessories for sale bulk wholesale from The Mabs Collection – day dresses, silk chiffon dresses, cotton dresses, evening coats, evening dresses, summer dresses, winter dresses, skirts, suits, coats, jackets, shoes, bags, etc etc . . .